5 Ways You Know You're In A Farm Truck

5 Ways You Know You're In A Farm Truck

They might run like you just drove them off the lot, or rattle and bang to the point where you question if you’re going to have to walk your way home. But besides the sounds they make, there are more sure-fire ways to figure out if you’re in a farm truck.

5. They smell. Sure, some vehicles may maintain that “new car smell” longer than others, but there is something “unique” to a farm truck. Depending on the time of year, it might smell like fresh cut hay from sitting out in a hayfield, or like hog manure for months after the driver set foot in a hog pen. You can try to put as many air fresheners as you like, but that unique smell, no matter what it might be, just won’t leave or be covered up.

4. The floor board is beginning to become non-existent or is caked in an inch of mud. My Dad’s truck is the latter. I usually am kind enough to set aside a few hours to clean his truck once a year. The floor mats always seem to leave the truck with about 3 pounds of dirt and are still impossible to clean. If it is the case of a non-existent floor board, you may want to think about dressing warmer than necessary in the winter, because odds are, the heat doesn’t work either.

3. It has everything you can possibly need on farm…if you can find it. Halters, ratchet straps, a tarp, jackets, sockets, wire, fence pliers, sunglasses, pens, antibiotics, electrical tape, hammer, clippers, needle and syringe, taggers, tags, or even toilet paper (which can be considered a necessity) might be found in a farm truck.

2. Some things may work better than others, or not at all. Like I said earlier, the heat may not work, or the windows being down is the air conditioning in the summer. In some cases, you might have to guess you’re speed relative to how fast you are making it from point A to point B because the dash doesn’t work. Maybe the tailgate just as well be non-existent since it’s held together and held up by an assembly of tarp or ratchet straps. There might also be the case that the radio works on one side of the truck better than the other.

1. Every dent, scratch and hole have a story. “Remember that time the brakes went out on the tractor and it ran into the truck?” “Or that time we milked for the neighbor and you hit the fence?” These are just some of the memories and dents I can identify on my Dad’s truck. In some ways, it’s just one big dent, but in other ways, it can be considered many fun or sometimes terrifying memories that I’ve made with my Dad.

 

A Great Big World: Escaping The Rural Texan Life

A Great Big World: Escaping The Rural Texan Life

Generational Farming: Passing Down the Farm

Generational Farming: Passing Down the Farm