A Letter to a Farmer, From a Fellow Farmer.

A Letter to a Farmer, From a Fellow Farmer.

Dear Farmer,

I want to say thank you for all the time, energy, man-hours and time spent away from your families that you give in order to grow food for the world. I myself come from a row crop and beef cattle operation, so I have seen what giving all those things up to produce a crop does to a body.  

Farming is a job that demands attention 24/7. If your family is like my family, there has been many Thanksgivings that has been put on the backburner in order to get the crop out on time. I can remember many holidays where my dad had to send my mom and I on, and would tell us to apologize that he had to work. For most people, it is hard to imagine that the whole family wouldn’t be together on Thanksgiving. It is so normal for my family; that we don’t even pay it any mind if my dad has to work all day on Thanksgiving.  We feed him lunch and we send him back out to the fields.

Vacation, isn’t a word my family uses often. The only time we take vacation might be a week in the summer when there is a lull in work, and the random road trips in the winter. I think it is safe to say there isn’t anywhere in the world that rivals the warm blanket of comfort that surrounds me when I am on my farm. Of course, while on the rare vacation, it is nice to not worry about getting up early to start feeding.

You probably think that all that energy, and all those man-hours you have put in are irrelevant to most people. Well, I guess in some aspects most people don’t care about how long it took you to get a broken down combine up and running. I can promise you that I know how exhausted you must be, and I definitely know how that exhaustion can affect your mood. My dad can be feisty if you call him when he is in the middle of fixing a piece of equipment, or if he is in the middle of a mad fit. Trust me when I say there is nothing worse then a mad farmer in the middle of harvest season.     

I like all the seasons, but fall is my favorite. I love the smell of diesel fuel, and dust from the combine. I love the fact that in the harvest season you get to reap the benefits of all the time, and energy you spent on the year’s crop. Another positive for fall is the fact that if you are able to harvest and get your hopper bottoms unloaded; you have some peace of mind knowing money is on the way.

I could write for days about the different things we as farmers and farm families deal with. I know you’re busy, so I’m going to just say one last thing. I want to thank you for being passionate about agriculture and the ways of life that rural Americans survive and thrive in.

Sincerely,

Your Fellow Farmer  

    

    

        

    

 

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